Normandy II

French traditional jewellery - Normandy
Other jewellery and iconography

 

 

Coiffe pins

 


coiffe pins, brass,
glass pearls and enamel

 

By the mid eighteenth century, each region, town or even village had its own distinctive costume for the women and between 1800 and 1830 a great variety of coiffes (lace or linen head-dresses) appeared. The coiffes in Normandy were usually attached by two pins, sometimes three or four for the larger coiffes.

Note that in the case of pairs of pins, the two were rarely identical, often a larger and more decorative pin was worn at the front and a simpler one behind or underneath the coiffe. The pins were sometimes attached together with a fine chain.  (Pairs of pins were not always for attaching coiffes; some were worn by men to fix their neckties).

Larger pins were also sometimes worn to hold closed the shawl or the light "fichu" worn by women, though in later years, after around 1850, a more traditional and less fragile brooch was used.


Coiffe pins adorned with a faceted spherical head are the most common in Normandy, followed by those with an enamelled pansy motif.


coiffe pins
gold and strass (Rhinestones)

 

 

 

 


four coiffe pins in gold with facetted heads

 

oiffe pin in gold
and Rhinestones

pansy coiffe pin in gold
and enamel

 

pansy coiffe pin in gold
and enamel

 

cliquez sur les photos pour les agrandir en haute résolution

 


pair of linked coiffe pins in gold and filigree


triple linked coiffe pins in gold and filigree

 

                          
pansy coiffe pins in gold and enamel

 


 

 


shawl pin

 

 


four linked coiffe pins in gold


 

 

 

                   
three pairs of linked coiffe pins in gold and turquoises

 

 

 

        
two pairs of linked coiffe pins in gold


 

 

 


three filigree gold coiffe pins

 

 

 

 


pansy coiffe pin in
gold and enamel

 


pair of linked pins in gold with natural pearls

 

pair of coiffe pins in gold-
plated brass and cameo

 

 

              

 

 


coiffe pin and Holy Spirit pendant, portrait circa 1830

click on the photos to enlarge them in high resolution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


coiffe pin in gold and
Bressan enamel



coiffe pin in gold and
Bressan enamel (a leaf missing)

 

 


coiffe pin in gold and
enamel

 


 

    


épingle de coiffe ou de châle en or et email Bressan

 


rare pair of mourning jewellery coiffe pins
from Normandy, in gold, enamel and pearls. 
There are three glass windows in each pin-head
behind which are placed twists of hair


close-up of pin-head showing hair
behind the window

(click on the photo to enlarge)

        

 

 

Dieppe ivory work

 

The town of Dieppe was famous in the 19th century for its ivory carving industry, the craftsmen there were second to none. Jewels in ivory were worn in Dieppe but also bought by visitors as well as being exported and today one finds them all over France.

              
ivory cross and ivory brooch from Dieppe




finely worked cross in
Dieppe ivory with ivy motif

 

 


bracelet in carved ivory from Dieppe, rose design

 

 


bracelet en ivoire de Dieppe, art déco

 

 

 


ivory brooch from Dieppe

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ivory brooch from Dieppe

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   ivory brooch from Dieppe

 

 

 

 

Earrings and ear pendants

 

For a long time earrings were not worn in Normandy because women's ears were hidden inside their coiffe.  When the shape of the coiffe permitted it, women chose quite long earrings, either the "poissardes", or articulated ear pendants.  The articulated earrings had an advantage in that the large pendant could be removed or added depending on the occasion, and the small section could be left in the ears at night without risk of damage, hense their name "dormeuses" or sleepers..


ear pendants from Normandy, gold


 


ear pendants from Normandy, gold

 

 


long pendant ear-rings and coiffe worn around Cambremer, Normandy, circa 1830
click on the photos to enlarge them in high resolution

 

 

 



portrait presumed to be of Charlotte Corday with fileuses ear pendants, oil painting on canvas circa 1790
 
     
  rare pair of 'fileuses' ear pendants, rolled-gold   catalogue by maison Baudot, Paris  

 

The 'fileuses' ear-pendants, although generally associated with Normandy by numerous illustrations and the ceramics of the Dieppe museum, were also worn in other regions, such as Auvergne, Provence and Vendée.  (1)   The wholesale catalogue held in the MuCEM edited by Maison Baudot in Paris around 1810 illustrates no less than 14 different versions of fileuses for sale.  (2)

 
 

 

gold ear pendants from Normandy


ear pendants from Normandy, gold

 

 

 


ear pendants,
Normandy, gold and enamel


ear pendants,
Normandy, gold and enamel


ear pendants,
Normandy, gold

 

 


"poissardes" (ear pendants) from Normandy in mother of pearl and steel
converted into brooches

 


"poissardes" ear pendants from Normandy in mother of pearl and gold

 

 

It seems likely that these poissarde ear pendants started out as simple polished mussel shells worn by fishmongers as a sign.  With the inevitable evolution of jewels they were circled with steel, then gold and were finally made entirely in gold, like the ones shown below.

 

 


 

very large gold ear pendants

 
very large gold ear pendants
 

 

 

 

 


Poissarde ear pendants gold and enamel

 


 Poissarde ear pendants
popular in Normandy, gold

 

 

 

 

 

Silver shirt buttons

 


silver shirt buttons, 19th century

 

These silver shirt buttons were worn by men in Normandy to close their shirt cuffs and also the collor of their shirt or long blue work blouse.


silver shirt buttons, 19th century

 

 


silver shirt buttons, 19th century

 

 

 


Silver cape clasps - agrafes de capot

 

 



cape clasp, silver, Normandy, 19th century

 

These silver cape clasps were used in Normandy to close the woman's cape, called "capot".  Their shape is always based on two circles, stylised buttons, with an openwork flower surround.  Some are quite thin and light and made by stamping while others, generally the older ones, are cast, thus heavier and hand finished with a chisel to give a facetted aspect.  It is likely that these silver clasps are descended directly from the Norman buttons, because we see the design of these buttons in the middle of each clasp. There are clasps in the Poitou region somewhat similar to Norman clasps, but if you look at them closely, you will notice that the motifs of the Poitevin clasps are in fact quite different.

 

 

 

 


cape clasp, silver, Normandy, 19th century

 

 

    
cape clasp, silver, Normandy, 19th century

 


cape clasp, stamped silver, Normandy, front view, 19th century

 

 


cape clasp, stamped silver, Normandy, back view, 19th century

 

 

   
         

cape clasp, stamped silver, Normandy, converted into a pair of brooches, 19th century

 

 

 

 

 
cape clasp, stamped silver, Normandy, 19th century, front view

 

               
the hallmarks


cape clasp, stamped silver, Normandy, 19th century, back view

 

 

 

Silver men's overcoat clasps

 

 

   
coatco
overcoat clasp, hand-formed and chiseled silver, Normandy, 1828-1838

 

 

 

   
coatcoovercoat clasp, hand-formed and chiseled silver, Normandy, 1828-1838



 

 

 

Rings

 


gold and enamelled pansy ring
(pansy = "pensez à moi", think of me)


 

ring know as 'à la française', popular in
Normandy, in rolled-gold and Rhinestones

 

 

                   
 'Bagues à la française' en or et strass

 

The same dies used by jewellers to stamp out the "à la française" rings, very popular in Normandy, were also used used to produce poissarde earrings, brooches and even stick-pins, of which some examples are shown at the top of this page.

 

 

 

 

 


Clasps or catches

 


  chain catch in gold and enamel


    chain catch in gold and enamel


  chain catch in gold and enamel

  chain catches in gold and enamel

 

Chain clasps or catches in Normandy tended to be of either a flat plaque shape or that of a hexagonal cylinder.  They were usually richly decorated with enamelled pansies, bouquets of flowers or hounds.  The pansy is a play on words, the French word for pansy is pensée which also means « think » as in « think of me. » A dog is the symbol of fidelity.

 

 


chain catch in gold

bijouxnormands


chain catch in gold and enamel


antique chain clasp converted into a brooch


chain clasp in gold and enamel

bijoux n

rmand


  chain clasp in gold and enamel with a dog motif


 

 


chain clasp in gold and enamel


  chain catch in gold and enamel


chain catch in gold and enamel

  chain catches in gold and enamel

 

 


chain catch in gold and enamel

 

 


chain catch in gold and enamel


  chain clasp in gold and enamel


  chain catch in gold and enamel

chain clasps in gold and enamel

 


chain catch in gold


chain catch in gold


chain clasp in gold

  chain clasps in gold

 

 

 

Slides

 

The function of the slide is to adjust the height at which the cross is worn without the need to undo the velvet ribbon.  In Normandy the slides are generally heart-shaped however those for the drille and Saint Lô crosses are often round.  The slides for the bosse crosses are decorated with filigree work. 

 

 

         
slides from Rouen crosses, gold and Rhinestones

 

 

 

         

Slide from a Normandy bosse cross with an unusual Phrygien bonnet motif, certainly made just after the French revolution of 1789, silver gilt

 

 


Slide from a Normandy bosse cross in gold

 

 

 

Slide from a Normandy bosse cross in gold (150%)

 

 

 

 

slide from Normandy


slide from Normandy


slide from Normandy

slide from Normandy

slide from Normandy

Slides from Normandy

 

 

 


Busquières

 

         
busquière in silver, recto-verso

 

Busquières, or corset-clips, were used to attach the exterieur decorative corset popular in the 18th century to the skirt.  The back was sewn to the inside of the skirt using the two holes and the laces of the corset were passed under the clip, thus ensuring that no amount of mouvement would create a disgracious gap between the upper and lower parts of a lady's attire.  Busquières were worn between 1730 and 1790, especially in Normandy.

         
busquière in silver and Rhinestones, recto-verso

 

 


silver busquières worn by a lady in a painting by Hubert Descours, 1771, courtesy The Bowes Museum

 


busquière in silver and Rhinestones which has been converted into a Chatelaine with three cupro-nickel chains

 

 

         
pair of busquières in silver

 

 

(1)  POULENC, Monique & MARGERIE, Anne-Michèle., Les bijoux traditionnels français, Musée des arts et traditions populaires, RMN, 2005

(2)  Catalogue de la Maison Baudot à Paris, MuCEM

 

 

 

French traditional jewellery
Iconography
 
 


chain with large pansy catch, pansy brooch

click on the photos to enlarge them in high resolution

 

 


postcard of Normandy regional jewellery

 


 

 


 Shellfish gatherers at Saint Michael's mount

 

 

 


folklore groupe with coiffes, costumes and jewellery from Normandy

 

 


French traditional jewellery
Saint Valéry en Caux, Normandy


French traditional jewellery
Cauchoise from Bolbec, Normandy

 

 


French regional jewellery
costumes and coiffes, Normandy


French regional jewellery,
costume and coiffe, Normandy

 

 


milk-maid with
brass milk pot (canne à lait), Normandy


French regional jewellery,
esclavage necklace and coiffe, Normandy

            

 


costume of the bourgeoisie from the Auge region
Saint Lô cross


costume of the rural bourgeoisie from southern
Normandy, around 1840

 

 


French regional jewellery,
costume and coiffe, Normandy


French regional jewelley,
costumes and coiffes, Normandy

 

 


French regional jewellery and costume,
Normandy


French regional jewellery and costume,
Normandy

 

 


peasants from the Caux region of Normandy

mussel-gatherer in folk-costume, Honfleur

 

 


French regional jewellery
and costumes, Normandy

folk-costume from Lisieux, Normandy


 

 


folk costume from Normandy - Cauchoise (pays de Caux region)

Louis-Marie Lanté - Georges-Jacques Gatine - Laurent P

 

 

 

Series of hand-coloured engravings on the costumes and coiffes of Normandy, 
by Louis-Marie Lanté , based on drawings made by Laurent Pêcheux in 1811
and by Georges-Jacques Gatine in 1819, published in 1827

 

In 1828, Amande-Narcisse MASSON de Saint Amand, in his book relating his voyage in Normandy, laments the quasi-disappearance of the splendid coiffes of Normany, replaced by city clothes. (4)


French regional costume and coiffe - Normandy - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Normandy - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Rouen - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional jewellery, costume and coiffe - Cauchoise - engraving by Pêcheux and Gatine, drawn 1811

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Rouen area - engraving by Pêcheux and Gatine, drawn 1811

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Normandy - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Bois d'Embourg - engraving by Pêcheux and Gatine, drawn 1811

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Bolbec - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Lisieux - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Caen - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Harcourt - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Bayeux - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 


chain of tressed horsehair with gold catch, similar to the chain illustrated above

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Saint Valery en Caux - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Saint Valery en Caux - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Saint Aubin - engraving by Lanté and Gatine,  drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Saint Aubin - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Crosville- engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Dieppe - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional jewellery, costume and coiffe - Isigny - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819
(Isigny is the town from which Walt Disney's family originated
)

 

 


French regional jewellery, costume and coiffe - Coutances - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional costume and coiffe - Coutances - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn 1819

 

 


French regional jewellery,  costume and coiffe - Rolleville - engraving by Lanté and Gatine, drawn  1819

 

 


French regional jewellery, mourning costume and coiffe - Cauchoise - engraving by Pêcheux and Gatine, 1811

 

 

French regional costume and coiffe - Cauchoise - engraving by Pêcheux and Gatine, drawn 1811

 

 

 

coiffe & costume from Argentan - photo 1846

 

 

coiffe & costume from Lisieux - photo 1846

 

 

page from the book by Le Chanoine Adolphe-André PORÉE, (1848-1939)
L’art normand.- Paris : Fontemoing et Cie, 1913

click on the photos to enlarge them in high resolution

 
 


French folk-costumes from Normandy - coiffe from Saint-Germain de Tournebut & silver cross from Saint Lô

 

 

(1)  MASSON SAINT-AMAND, Armand-Claude, Mémoire statistique du département de l'Eure, adressé au ministre de l'Intérieur d'après ses instructions par M. Masson Saint-Amand, préfet de ce département, publié par ordre du gouvernement.  A Paris, de l'imprimerie impériale, an XIII (rapport basé sur des observations faits en 1801, publié en 1805)

(2)   BOURET, Brigitte., Bijoux et orfèvres en Haute Normandie au XIX siècle, Musées départementaux de Seine Maritime, 1993

(3)   BRUNEAU, Marguerite., Histoire du costume populaire en Normandie, Cercle d'action et d'études normandes, 1983

(4)   MASSON de SAINT-AMAND, Amande-Narcisse, Yves., Lettres d'un voyageur à l'embouchure de la Seine, Guibert (Paris), 1828

 

contenu:
 

bijoux normands - bijoux et orfevres en haute Normandie - croix de Saint Lô - croix de Rouen - croix de Caen - croix drille - croix cde Pierres - Saint Esprit normand - croix de Dieppe - ivoire de Dieppe - croix bosse - épingle de coiffe - croix papillon - croix à la Jeannette - ivoire de Dieppe - collier d'esclavage - pendants d'oreille fileuses - poissardes - croix d'Yvetot - agrafe de cape - vlamse haart - Lanté et Gatine - croix de Boulogne - boucles d'oreilles Milanos - pendants d'oreilles Milanos - bague Lisbonne - bague noeud d'amour - chaine sorcière - croix de pardon - bijoux boulonnais - coiffe soleil - costume de matelotte - bague capelet - croix de Champagne - croix d'Alsace - broche alsacienne - croix de Lorraine - bijoux des régions de France - les bijoux des Français - les  bijoux de France - bijoux régionaux - bijou régional - croix écotée - pendentif Saint Esprit - Saint Esprit d'Aurillac - rose de Velay - collier d'esclavage - croix de Puy en Velay  - croix d'Auvergne - bijoux d'Auvergne - bijoux auvergnat - collier Saint Esprit de Puy en Velay - croix de Velay - bijoux d'Auvergne et du Velay - costume regional - bijoux régionaux - coiffe  - coiffe auvergnat - bijoux des régions de France - bijoux régionaux - les bijoux traditionnels Français - croix régionales - Léon Giron - Antoine Raspal - Thomas Desgeorge - Estella Canziani - esclavage auvergnat - French regional jewellery – jewelry - French traditional jewellery – jewelry - French folk-dress - French folk costumes - antique French jewellery - les bijoux de France - les bijoux des Français - Streeksieraden en Zeeland Friesland - Vlaamse Hart

 

French traditional jewellery - Normandy
Other jewellery and iconography