Burgundy

French regional jewellery - Burgundy

 

 

 

The nivernaise cross


Nivernaise cross with its slide in rolled gold

 

 

The Nivernaise cross is a hollow flat cross set with spheres at the ends. The finial of the cross is in the shape of a smooth and perforated fleur-de-lys to allow the passage of a large suspension ring. The top part of the cross is decorated with horizontal grooves. The rectangular slide is often decorated with a plaque in enamel and bordered with designs in relief. 

 

 


Nivernaise cross with its slide in rolled gold

BIJOUX REGIONAUX ANCIE

 

NS - BIJOU REGIONA

Ear pendants


Two ear pendants, gold plated and enamel

 

 

These ear pendants are made with the same rectangular plaques that we see used as slides on the crosses. The two illustrated above, which are different from each other and not a pair, might very well be samples used by a jewellery salesman.

 

 

The Mâcon cross


Mâcon cross in gilt metal with velvet ribbon decorated with sequins and spangles

 

This cross with its ribbon was sold to the Victoria et Albert museum during the International Exhibition of 1872 in London and claimed to be from the town of Mâcon.  I have no other trace of similar crosses from Macon.  It is made of gilt metal and the museum paid one pound and 14 shillings for it.

 

 


Mâcon cross in steel with velvet ribbon decorated with sequins, spangles and other motifs in cut and polished steel

 

 

This cross with it's ribbon was sold to the Victoria et Albert museum during the International Exhibition of 1872 in London and claimed to be from the town of Macon.  I have no other trace of similar crosses from Mâcon.  It is made of cut or stamped steel and the museum paid 17 shillings and six pence for it.  During the Exhibition, the French Superior Commission of Exhibitions wrote in it's report -  "At Mâcon, pretty little plates of polished steel, cut with great finesse and as if they were stamped out, are fixed on velvet necklaces, like those that our elegant Parisians did not disdain to wear just a few years ago." (1)  The question is, were these  necklaces really worn at Macon, or did the commission simply see necklaces that the Parisian jewellers had concocted for sale to the London market and exhibited on the Burgundy stand?

 

 

 

 

The Burgundy slave necklace

 

The "slave necklaces" from the Burgundy region are quite different from those of other regions such as Normandy or Auvergne.  The form of the plaques, which are stamped in relief and embellished with Rhinestones or enamelled discs from Bourg-en-Bresse, is unique to this region.  These necklaces are quite rare in solid gold, and are mostly found made in rolled gold (doublé).

 

 


coiffe and costume from Macon with slave necklace

 

 


"slave necklace" from Burgundy in gold, enamel and Rhinestones


"slave necklace" from Burgundy in gold, pearls and Rhinestones

 


detail (200%)

 

 

 


"slave necklace" in rolled gold and enamel

click on the photos to see them in high resolution

     

 


"slave necklace" from Burgundy in rolled gold and enamel

 

 


"slave necklace" from Burgundy in rolled gold and enamel

 

 

 


"slave necklace" from Burgundy in gold, enamel and Rhinestones

 

 

 


"esclavage" (slave) necklace and French folk-dress from the Macon region

 

 

 

The 'rangs d'or' necklace

 



"rang d'or" necklace from Burgundy in rolled gold

 

 

 


 "rang d'or" necklace worn in Bourg-en-Bresse (Ain department)

 

 

 

 

The wedding cup

 

In Burgundy the bride was offered a wedding cup in silver or engraved glass for drinking during the ceremony; for the less fortunate families the cup was made of pewter. The Burgundy wedding cup, of a shape distinctive to the region, was usually engraved with the wife's name or her initials. This wedding cup was later used for everyday use as well as during baptisms and communions and eventually placed in front of the coffin of the deceased and filled with holy water ...

The family usually offered a beaker or wedding cup to the woman and a wine cup (tastevin) to the man. In the past, one had to bring one’s own eating utensils if one wanted to eat or drink in an inn or party and the flat shape of the tastevin was studied to be easily transportable in a pocket. ¨For more modest people, the cups and tastevins were made in pewter or even wood.

 

 

 

 


Burgundy silver wedding cup, c1780, (50%)


Burgundy silver wedding cup, 1855, argent (50%)

 

 



"esclavage" (slave) necklace and French folk-dress from the Macon region

 

 

 

 


  pair of coiffe pins in gold with brass stems

 


 pair of coiffe pins in steel with glass pearls

 

 

 



brionnaise folk-dress

 

contents:
 

BLONDEL, Madeleine., Pense à moi, Musée de la vie Bourguignon Perrin de Puycousin - croix d'Alsace - broche alsacienne - croix de Lorraine - bijoux des régions de France - les bijoux des Français - les  bijoux de France - bijoux régionaux - bijou régional - croix écotée - pendentif Saint Esprit - Saint Esprit d'Aurillac - rose de Velay - collier d'esclavage - croix de Puy en Velay  - croix d'Auvergne - bijoux d'Auvergne - bijoux auvergnat - collier Saint Esprit de Puy en Velay - croix de Velay - bijoux d'Auvergne et du Velay - costume regional - bijoux régionaux - coiffe  - coiffe auvergnat - bijoux des régions de France - bijoux régionaux - les bijoux traditionnels Français - croix régionales - Léon Giron - Antoine Raspal - Thomas Desgeorge - Estella Canziani - esclavage auvergnat - antieke zeeuwse streeksieraden in zeeland friesland - Brabantse klederdrachten en streeksieraden

 


French regional jewellery - Burgundy